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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m a sucker for all the small details, even when it comes to small things like valve stem caps. Anyone have any pics of some nice ones they use?

I got some K5 ones which I really like but the little round K5 emblem fell off on 3 of 4 of the caps 😕


249960


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Your K5 Optima Vendor
Tesla Model X P100D
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Looks really nice on your wheels, and oh no.

Have you tried reaching out to the company you bought them from, to see if they would send you out a replacement? 🤷‍♂️

Might be a good idea, they’d probably get you taken care of. 😉
 

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2012 Black SX Prem. & Tech.
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I've heard that if you have metal stems, you should avoid metal caps. The metal-on-metal contact will have a risk of corrosion to degrade the stems, and fusing the caps onto the stems. maybe you can take off the caps, add some kind of grease (or maybe the teflon plumbing tape), and then re-apply carefully to ensure no metal-to-metal contact?
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
Tesla Model X P100D
Joined
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28,640 Posts
I've heard that if you have metal stems, you should avoid metal caps. The metal-on-metal contact will have a risk of corrosion to degrade the stems, and fusing the caps onto the stems. maybe you can take off the caps, add some kind of grease (or maybe the teflon plumbing tape), and then re-apply carefully to ensure no metal-to-metal contact?
Those are usually the cheap steel ones that are manufactured in China. These are aluminum, and don’t seem to have that issue, at least in the past 4-5 years we’ve been selling them. However, using Teflon tape is always a good recommendation, and can’t really hurt.
 

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This site explains how you get galvanic corrosion because the different metals in the stem and the valve core, where the metal cap (regardless of what kind of metal) might provide a conduction path. But if the metal cap is also a different metal compared to the valve stem (like steel) then you accelerate the galvanic corrosion even more:

"For TPMS sensor hardware, the aluminum valve stem serves as the anode and the brass valve core as the cathode. The electrolyte comes in the form of water (or any moisture, really). How galvanic corrosion works is the aluminum in the valve stem will dissolve into the electrolyte (moisture) and deposit onto the brass valve core. While the corrosion process is underway, the valve stem is losing its thickness and strength. Finally, it will fail, usually breaking where the valve core was in the most contact with the aluminum at the treads. This condition can be further exacerbated by the introduction of an additional cathode in the form of a steel valve cap causing the damage to the valve stem on the externally treaded portion, as well as on the inside."
Galvanic Corrosion: The TPMS Killer
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
Tesla Model X P100D
Joined
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28,640 Posts
This site explains how you get galvanic corrosion because the different metals in the stem and the valve core, where the metal cap (regardless of what kind of metal) might provide a conduction path. But if the metal cap is also a different metal compared to the valve stem (like steel) then you accelerate the galvanic corrosion even more:



Galvanic Corrosion: The TPMS Killer
Thanks for sharing, thankfully, we have not had any customers report this issue with our valve stem caps in the 6.5+ years we have been selling them, but good to know nonetheless.
 
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