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I have a 2016 Optima with 21k on on it and was wondering if anyone uses Prestone All Vehicles- 10yr/300k mi- Antifreeze?
When should the 1st Antifreeze change Occur? 5yrs 30K?
Anyone use a flush? what type is best?
How do you get all the antifreeze out of the radiator (easy), engine (?) etc.?
 

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Maybe a little overkill, but the owner's manual indicates a 5yr or 60k mile first change. See no reason Prestone couldn't be used, but over the years I've used Peak concentrate, just drained the radiator/refill, and never had a problem with any of the cars. I've used the concentrate will distilled water to be sure.
 

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Concentrate or ready-to-use, will be listed on the product front label. Pay attention to that before purchase.

In situations where I could not find a working drain plug on the bottom of the radiator, I would remove the bottom radiator hose. Be careful, so you are not scolded with hot coolant.

Engine should be running when sliowly entering new coolant. If unsure about proper installation, take it to an oil change shop and they will flush it, avoiding concern over creating engine damage.

I never flushed my last Colorado pickup. Every two years, I would remove bottom radiator hose and just install about 3/4's of a gallon. So the 17 year-old vehicle never saw all new fluid. But it did get roughly a 50% change in coolant every two years (at 20k).

No corrosion - same OEM radiator - only 2nd thermostat in it's lifetime. Never overheats or remains cold air-heat in the winter. So my M.O. worked well and I played it safe. Some of the engines today are thin, light aluminum blocks. Need to be careful when working on parts surrounding it..
 

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With my other cars I always used Concentrate and dilute with distilled water . But older cars never had the issue of WRONG ANTIFREEZE (94 ford I top off with whatever I had on hand). I know read if you mix incorrect antifreezes it could gum up!

I also read factory used different formula's so your not 100% sure what is in yours?

I guess I will do what I did with my 2007 Toyota take the top and bottom hose off (bypassing the radiator and with a hose and another person starting car run water thru system. Then run 3 gallons of distilled water. Next a quart of concentrate than 50/50 until I see antifreeze come out, shut engine and quickly attach bottom hose. Attach top hose close ballcock. lastly fill radiator and reservoir with 50/50.
 

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There is a plastic drain plug at the bottom of the radiator, it's very easy to remove by hand, just unscrew.

No need to remove hoses. There is some mixing of old and new, but no need to get 100% perfection when draining out the old. Just do a few fill/drains with warming the engine and running the heater.
 

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There is a plastic drain plug at the bottom of the radiator, it's very easy to remove by hand, just unscrew.

No need to remove hoses. There is some mixing of old and new, but no need to get 100% perfection when draining out the old. Just do a few fill/drains with warming the engine and running the heater.
But how do you know that you get all out (I have no idea what's in there now) and you will not gum up antifreeze when you put in new one? Also how to you achieve a 50-50 mix?
 

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There are several approaches to address all of those issues.

1. Why do you want to get out every last drop of coolant? Can you think about your oil system - and how you never get all the old oil out. You still have some leftover old oil, that is mixed and diluted by the new oil so it's not an issue. Same with coolant. You drain out all you can, then add the new, and the new dilutes the old. Then you can repeat this multiple times if you want, keep diluting the old coolant.

2. Why do you think you will gum up the coolant? Use distilled water to dilute the old coolant until it's practically pure water. You can buy several gallons for $5 and fill/run/drain the engine several times. So even if you have totally wrong old coolant from before, you can get pretty much all of it out by draining it, refilling with distilled water, running the engine to warm it up, run the heater, then letting it cool and drain out. Repeat that until you feel comfortable, noting how the color will change until it's clear.

3. Three main ways to ensure 50-50: 1-just use pre-mixed coolant, so you are adding 50-50. You can also add/warm/drain and repeat that a couple times. 2-if you use concentrate, you can pre-mix it in a bucket to make sure it's 50-50 before you add it. 3-if you don't want to pre-mix, then you can add specific amounts of concentrate and distilled water, like one quart at a time, to make sure you are putting balanced amounts in.

With any of these approaches, there will be leftover old stuff that will affect the mixture, but as you repeat the process of draining/refilling, the leftover will eventually approach the new stuff so that it's equalized. But even if you don't repeat at all, the leftover won't really throw off the final ratio much at all, and you can consult your owner's manual to see that the concentration ratio can vary a bit and still perform optimally.
 

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Also confirm that you are using new coolant that is compatible with the engine. You don't want to use the kind that will corrode aluminum.

There are even coolants that state on the label which brands they are compatible with, but also look at the formulation. I can't recall off the top of my head, but the new coolant I used to do my flush was pink, and the old coolant I drained out was green.

I drained the coolant, and then added distilled water and a bottle of chemical flush/cleaning. Then I drained and filled with distilled water again, warming up the engine and running the heater. Then I did the same with new coolant, using two jugs to allow me to fill with new, drain, then fill with new again.

Here is a procedure you can follow, and you can just repeat the drain/run/fill steps to get even more of the old stuff out:
 

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Thank you for your response, this is a very similar way I did changes for decades on my Chevy/Buick/Ford and Toyota. But when I went to buy Antifreeze to add a pint to my Kia I found out that there are many different types and specific to certain makes. So I searched the internet where I found out that the 2016 Kia, where built using 2 different types of Antifreeze. Without knowing which one that is in my car I can't top off the pint I require.. Upon further research I found out if you mix two of different types of antifreeze three things could occur depending on the types.
A.) it will be ok to mix
B.) the additives in the antifreeze could inactivate each other and leave you less protected
C.) the two antifreezes could gum up
1) I agree you don't ever remove all of the old oil and I never used to remove all of the old antifreeze, but from what I read I don't want to take a chance with C above.
2) based on what I read, toping off (mixing a small amount) with the wrong type of fluid could gum up and block the passages.
3) I used to fill up the engine with plain water and then put concentrate in radiator, estimated based on the fluid capacity. after driving the car and letting the water and concentrate mix I used a hydrometer to check it was at 50/50.

Issues, with the old way of fluid change
I) need to clean out all prior fluid to avoid contamination.
II) I specifically read not to put 50% of water in first then 50% of concentrate
III)so if I clean out the system with a water flush until it runs clear then drain I will still have about half the system filled with water in the engine and heater. Adding 50/50 antifreeze will never get total to 50/50.

I guess I can rely on this method but rely on my hydrometer.

As for the type of antifreeze I was planning to use, it was Prestone All Vehicles- 10yr/300k mi- Antifreeze which states if can be used with all brands of cars and all types of engines' including aluminum and not void any warranty. It also said it can be mixed with any fluid??? This was the main reason for the post to see if anyone used Prestone All Vehicles- 10yr/300k mi- Antifreeze with their Kia and to find out the results. I.e. long term did the water pump fail? I imaging the antirust additive must be very good to state 10yr/300k mi. but I have no idea how good their water pump lubricant's are.

I do have a question about the chemical flush, at what mileage did you do it? I have never used one and unfamiliar with them. Do you know if Kia approves them? Note my cars do almost all city driving i.e. Severe and none of them made it to 100k without replacing the water pump. Also note tranny's never make it to 100k either. That is the reason I am planning to change all fluids more frequently with my Optima. Therefore by 100k I would be replacing the radiator and tranny fluid 3 times or SEVERE+.
 

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I will take a photo of the coolant I used, I still have the jug with the label intact that shows compatibility.

Could you extract a little of the old coolant (use a turkey baster, or even just put a catch pan under the drain petcock and drain a little out), and then mix with the same amount of the new coolant, and observe if there is a reaction? Add some aluminum metal shavings and shake it up.

I did the chemical flush at 100K miles. I don't know if Kia approves it. But in my case, it was unnecessary because my old coolant was clean when drained out, and also I didn't see any built-up debris or corrosion come out with the old coolant or the distilled water and flush chemical, it just looked nice and clean when I drained it out both times.

I'm still on the original water pump and tranny, no problems there so far.
 

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Why would anyone add water first? What if too much water is added and not enough space remaining for the antifreeze?
Add the concentrate first, then the water, and no chemical flush needed.

Don't know what kind of vehicles you've owned, but not having a water-pump and transmission make it to 100k miles is
something I've never heard of in my lifetime, whether city or highway driving.
 

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Why would anyone add water first? What if too much water is added and not enough space remaining for the antifreeze?
Add the concentrate first, then the water, and no chemical flush needed.

Don't know what kind of vehicles you've owned, but not having a water-pump and transmission make it to 100k miles is
something I've never heard of in my lifetime, whether city or highway driving.
LOL you never talked to someone who lives in a big city ...everyone here has problems with water pumps. This is because our trips will usually be very short 1 to 5 miles. 3-4 times a day each time starting cold. We take mass transit to work and when we do go on the expressway its a parking lot! This all creates a lot of acids in the car and contaminant's. Car type or make don't matter. I had a Malibu, Regal, Taurus, and currently own an Avalon and the newer Kia. Some of the American cars the radiator failed a number of times, but all failed at least once b4 100k.

Great idea's King Fatty I will do that and leave in a glass bottle and see if it rusts or gums up. I might even heat it up a couple of times.Thanks.

As for the guy with the site promoting do not use Distilled water THAT IS AN ADVERTSMENT FOR SOFTENED WATER which will void your warranty. DO NOT LISTEN TO IT. If you are afraid of distilled water use de-ionized water.
 

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LOL you never talked to someone who lives in a big city ...everyone here has problems with water pumps. This is because our trips will usually be very short 1 to 5 miles. 3-4 times a day each time starting cold. We take mass transit to work and when we do go on the expressway its a parking lot! This all creates a lot of acids in the car and contaminant's. Car type or make don't matter. I had a Malibu, Regal, Taurus, and currently own an Avalon and the newer Kia. Some of the American cars the radiator failed a number of times, but all failed at least once b4 100k.

Great idea's King Fatty I will do that and leave in a glass bottle and see if it rusts or gums up. I might even heat it up a couple of times.Thanks.

As for the guy with the site promoting do not use Distilled water THAT IS AN ADVERTSMENT FOR SOFTENED WATER which will void your warranty. DO NOT LISTEN TO IT. If you are afraid of distilled water use de-ionized water.
My father lived in a big city and 2.5 miles of gridlock to work, never replaced a water pump and I must admit, don't see why city driving would make a water pump fail early when they can last hundreds of thousands of miles. I've also worked on cars my entire life and have never heard of this nor can I fathom this as a ligament reason for failure as normally the bearing would wear, destroy the seal and water leaks, so how can a bearing fail on ever car early becuase of city driving?
 

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[QUOTE="Turbonut, post: 2236017, member: 70170"Don't know what kind of vehicles you've owned, but not having a water-pump and transmission make it to 100k miles is
something I've never heard of in my lifetime, whether city or highway driving.
[/QUOTE]
The water pump in my 2004 GMC Yukon made it to "only" 110K miles before it went bad--and that's despite the fact that the Yukon had a coolant replacement at 71K miles. Perhaps it was the GM "Death"-cool coolant that did in the water pump...
 

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[QUOTE="Turbonut, post: 2236017, member: 70170"Don't know what kind of vehicles you've owned, but not having a water-pump and transmission make it to 100k miles is
something I've never heard of in my lifetime, whether city or highway driving.
The water pump in my 2004 GMC Yukon made it to "only" 110K miles before it went bad--and that's despite the fact that the Yukon had a coolant replacement at 71K miles. Perhaps it was the GM "Death"-cool coolant that did in the water pump...
[/QUOTE]

Well, you made it over the magical 100k mile plateau.
Also, the coolant change doesn't affect the bearing as that is usually what goes, the shaft no longer is rigid so that in turns knocks out the seal.
 
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