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2017 Kia Optima
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Discussion Starter #1
My usb charger is pathetic. It doesn't even charge enough to keep the phone at the same level as when I started the drive. After poking around the forum it appears that is common.

Do you know if there is something I can do to increase the power enough to get my phone to quick charge?

If not is there anything I can do to swap out one of the 2 cig lighters for for a USB quick charge such as. Quick Charge 3.0 Car Charger, CHGeek 12V/24V 36W Aluminum Waterproof Dual QC3.0 USB Fast Charger Socket Power Outlet with LED Digital Voltmeter for Marine, Boat, Motorcycle, Truck, Golf Cart and More: Amazon.ca: Cell Phones & Accessories

Does anyone know how to remove the usb/aux/cig lighters in the pic

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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2013 Ebony SXL 2nd engine @ 121k
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2018 Kia Optima
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David--what are the specs of the wireless charging kit? I'm especially curious as to the delivery wattage since that will for the most part determine how quickly the kit can charge the phone, especially when it comes to iPhones since according to Google wireless charging for iPhone 8 through 10 is maxed out at 7.5W which is not a whole lot more than the 5W standard charging output, while iPhone XS and newer can support wireless charging up to 10W.

Now if OP has an Android phone I suppose this post would be moot but I'd still be interested nonetheless as to what the output wattage is if ever I decide to use one of your wirless charging kits in my SXL.
 

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OP--although the front USB port in the Optima (the one in your picture) is capable of supplying charging power it is not best suited for such a purpose since its primary function is to connect a device to your Optima head unit for phone/music/CarPlay/Android Auto functionality. As others have mentioned in this thread you can either go with a cig lighter adapter charger or the wireless charger product David mentioned but keep in mind that since wireless CarPlay and Android Auto are not available in any Optima older than 2020, any audio streaming options will be limited to Bluetooth if you go with the cig lighter adapter charger. Not sure if an Android and/or iPhone device is smart enough to still perform wireless charging via the wireless charging pad if either device detects that it is connected to the Optima's USB audio port--i.e., does the device disable wireless charging if it detects that it's connected to a USB port?

Another thing you may want to look into is if your device is doing way too many different things simultaneously such that its overall power draw is too much for the Optima's USB audio port to keep up with, power-wise; I'm pretty certain that the Optima USB audio port is putting out no more than 5W (5V/1A) so in theory it is quite possible that your phone may be doing some things that are consuming a combined >5W of power.
 

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2017 Kia Optima
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Discussion Starter #6
David--what are the specs of the wireless charging kit? I'm especially curious as to the delivery wattage since that will for the most part determine how quickly the kit can charge the phone, especially when it comes to iPhones since according to Google wireless charging for iPhone 8 through 10 is maxed out at 7.5W which is not a whole lot more than the 5W standard charging output, while iPhone XS and newer can support wireless charging up to 10W.

Now if OP has an Android phone I suppose this post would be moot but I'd still be interested nonetheless as to what the output wattage is if ever I decide to use one of your wirless charging kits in my SXL.
I'm also interested in specs. I have pixel phone (android) and want to know if it has quick/rapid charge.
 

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2017 Kia Optima
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
OP--although the front USB port in the Optima (the one in your picture) is capable of supplying charging power it is not best suited for such a purpose since its primary function is to connect a device to your Optima head unit for phone/music/CarPlay/Android Auto functionality. As others have mentioned in this thread you can either go with a cig lighter adapter charger or the wireless charger product David mentioned but keep in mind that since wireless CarPlay and Android Auto are not available in any Optima older than 2020, any audio streaming options will be limited to Bluetooth if you go with the cig lighter adapter charger. Not sure if an Android and/or iPhone device is smart enough to still perform wireless charging via the wireless charging pad if either device detects that it is connected to the Optima's USB audio port--i.e., does the device disable wireless charging if it detects that it's connected to a USB port?

Another thing you may want to look into is if your device is doing way too many different things simultaneously such that its overall power draw is too much for the Optima's USB audio port to keep up with, power-wise; I'm pretty certain that the Optima USB audio port is putting out no more than 5W (5V/1A) so in theory it is quite possible that your phone may be doing some things that are consuming a combined >5W of power.
Thanks for the info tonester
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
2020 Audi R8 V10+ & Tesla Model X P100D
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David--what are the specs of the wireless charging kit? When it comes to iPhones since according to Google wireless charging for iPhone 8 through 10 is maxed out at 7.5W which is not a whole lot more than the 5W standard charging output, while iPhone XS and newer can support wireless charging up to 10W.

Now if OP has an Android phone I suppose this post would be moot but I'd still be interested nonetheless as to what the output wattage is if ever I decide to use one of your wirless charging kits in my SXL.
Where did you read this from? This is what I show for the iPhone:

Although all Apple smartphones since the iPhone 8 support 18W fast charging, the company always bundled in a 5W chargers with its devices. Fortunately for users wanting to upgrade this year, that has changed with this year’s iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max as they ship with an 18W adapter. However, that certainly doesn’t mean that 18W is the upper limit on iPhone 11 fast charging as a new report says that all three models can actually obtain a higher charge limit.


I'm also interested in specs. I have pixel phone (android) and want to know if it has quick/rapid charge.
It 100% is a fast charger, as I have used it here in my office for charging of my own phone.

Here is what is shows on the box. This uses QI inductive Fast Charging & it is Qi Version # 1.2.4 released back in 2017.

249606
 

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2016 Kia Optima
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i just go with a cig adapter and play my music via bluetooth. its not my preferred way of doing things, but it is what it is.
 

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2018 Kia Optima
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David--Apple, in their infinite wisdom has decided to no longer include phone chargers (as well as earphones) starting with the iPhone 12 model line (back when the iPhone 11 was first released I believe it did include the 18W charger but later shipments no longer include them--lucky me, as my iPhone 11 Pro Max came with the 18W charger and EarPods included)...something about being environmentally friendly or something to that effect. 😇

Also--iPhones (starting with iPhone 11) can (officially) do fast-charging only if you use an Apple-branded USB-C power adapter (or an MFI-verified one) but we are talking about "wireless" charging here--IOW, at least as far as iPhones are concerned fast wireless charging is at a minimum fairly crippled; tests show that for iPhones the initial power draw during wireless charging is 7.5W (essentially 1/2 the power draw of Qi 1.2.x which allows for up to 15 W) but then in short time drops down to 5W--meaning, at that point wireless charging is going no faster than using the 5W charger that comes bundled with all iPhones prior to iPhone 11. Of course one could choose to split hairs and argue that if a wireless charger can put out 7.5W to an iPhone then it's a "fast" wireless charger (relative to the baseline 5W output) but then we'd be talking semantics here...and again, the initial high-wattage output drops down fairly quickly, most likely in an attempt to prevent possible heat-related issues due to extended high-power draw.

Not that any of this matters here anyway since OP has since indicated his phone is an Android device. :cool:

Again, not knocking your product--looks like it should suit the OP's needs just fine.
 
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