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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey so I have an issue and I’d appreciate some help from people out here. So I wanted to be an individual and install a baffled duel inlet oil catch can on my 2019 Optima S and now the check engine light is on with an idle that jumps to a little over 1k to half that and then back up. I don’t think I installed it wrong since the instructions were included in the packaging
 

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2011 Kia Optima
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Just guessing, it's probably a vacuum leak, but not being able to see what/how everything was plumbed, remove the OCC and go back to stock before something else is affected.
With the engine running there are ways to check for a leak, some use water, soapy water, carb cleaner, starter fluid, but got to be careful as some spray very flammable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just guessing, it's probably a vacuum leak, but not being able to see what/how everything was plumbed, remove the OCC and go back to stock before something else is affected.
With the engine running there are ways to check for a leak, some use water, soapy water, carb cleaner, starter fluid, but got to be careful as some spray very flammable.
Thanks I’ll give it a check
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
2019 Stinger GT1
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Welcome to the Optima Forums @Abenitez99

Sorry to hear you're having this issue. As mentioned above, this usually can happen if there is a boost leak in the system.

I would double check all of the hoses, as well as making sure you have Teflon around all of the fittings to make sure there are no leaks.

Hope you are able to get it figured out.

-David
K5 Optima Store
 

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Wait...is this the correct hose configuration for the dual-inlet?

I have a 2013 with turbo and my engine is different than pictured, but not tubed that way. My outlet is going into the intake.

I connected it as per instructions that came with the catch can.

There's no instructions on K5OS or ADD website, so I've emailed ADD with questions.

EDIT: Mine is configured just like this other forum post: Another Catch Can question
 

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For that specific model I'd say it's correct in that the OEM fresh air intake tube is eliminated and a filter is added to the valve cover. One inlet from the PCV system and two outlets, one into the intake (same as factory), the other into the air intake hose.
I didn't like this setup so mine is still sitting in the garage.

They make so many varieties of OCC's it's difficult to know what is correct unless you have the exact model, or schematic posted.
 

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2018 Kia Optima
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Laguna--I can't speak as to whether that is indeed the correct setup for a V3.3 installed on a 2013 2.0T but I do know that the diagram that pops up in the link you posted does not show the same exact connections as that shown in the installation diagram that came with my V3.3 (which I posted in the same thread as that of the link you posted in your reply) that I installed on my 2018 2.0T. Did your kit come with a breather filter? The difference between your diagram and mine is that on mine the factory PCV to intake manifold hose is not plugged; one hose connection is made from PCV to OCC, another connection is made utilizing the existing factory PCV to IM hose from OCC to IM, then the third connection is made from OCC to air intake port; the factory hose connection between valve cover breather port and air intake port is removed and the valve cover breather port is "plugged" with the supplied ADD breather filter.
 

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Personally I don't think ADD really has a handle on the OCC setup, or what they say is the "best" setup as every new model they come out with is supposed to be the best. Although I haven't done an install, I have the same setup as tonester, and can attest to the fact that it has one inlet and two outlets, and at the time of purchase, that was the "newly" designed unit, but trying to find it now on their (Add), or any website is impossible. Presently their new OCC, that Laguna installed, is a dual inlet single outlet unit and that's now supposed to be the best.:mad:
 

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^ This has got to be the dumbest setup I've ever seen. Where does the fresh air enter the engine to circulate and clean the blowby from the crankcase when both the inlet at the VC and outlet PCV side are connected to the in at the OCC and then out to a very limp vacuum source. Also where's all the vacuum that will be needed for pulling the air into the air intake tube? The tube is what 4" in diameter with a large opening at the end, air filter. Not only this situation, but the engine will be trying to suck air in through the valve cover and if it was successful the air would be coming from the OCC contaminated.
Every engine I've build needed some kind of fresh air intake along with a way to cleanse the crankcase and back out, either through a PCV valve system, or even into the exhaust system (not on a street car).
Maybe I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed, so guess I'll be looking for some feedback.
 

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Laguna--I have seen the diagram you posted that shows the plug as far back as mid-last year when I was debating whether I should go with the V3 or V3.3; fast-forward to January 2020 when I chose to go with the V3.3; the kit that arrived on my doorstep included the "updated" diagram and the breather filter (no plug). I can only presume that the kit I received is the "updated" V3.3 kit meant for the (4th-gen) Optima--otherwise I'm gonna need to have a talk with David about that. ;)

Turbonut--I was more or less thinking the same thing as you when I saw that diagram layout; makes one wonder as to how the blowby would manage to go from the VC to the OCC...gravity? Centrifugal force? Some other magical force?
 

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I can say that it works. If it's efficient, that's up for debate. But it does collect **** and am not throwing any codes or experiencing any engine problems/lag/etc. My collection is mostly gas since my tune.

I am not a gearhead as much as others, but I always understood catch cans to grab what is unspent, remove the oil, and pipe it to the intake to spend it.

This blog seems to indicate the same as my understanding, specifically in the picture where it shows in/out: Oil Catch Cans – What You Should Know – How To Choose, Buy & Build
 

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Don't take this as a derail for the OP question, but I had my finger on the button to buy a good OCC and then decided to watch a few videos of the pros and cons. The conclusion was unless you drive a car meant for the track and use the type that recirculates back in to the crank case and must be heated to burn off the water/fuel mixed with the oil it can, and prob will, do more harm than good. The test with the basic OCC for street and daily drivers showed next to nothing for help and can also create an imbalance of vacuum pressures. I know to each their own but I decided it's not worth the risk as I don't drive on the track or want to ruin a warranty.

So in summary unless you figure out how to heat that can I would suggest taking it off.
 

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I received this latest response from ADD after informing him of my setup and asking if my routing is correct with the plug and all. I am waiting on further details and diagram on how this should be setup now and will share that once I have it.

"There is a new update set up with the check valves and different hose route."
 
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