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Discussion Starter #21
Wow!
That was an old post. You need to see post #8.
I bought the full size Kia wheel and tire years back. To fit it, you need to remove the plastic blocks on the bottom of the wheel well(y)
 

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I have not had to ever take out a spare tire in over 25 years. I always keep a plug kit and tire pump that plugs into the cigarette lighter. Every time I get a nail or screw in the tire, I pull it out right where the car sits and and pump up the tire and use the plug kit to fix it. I never have to jack up the car or anything like that. I have ended up using this more for other people than I do myself. Even if I get a whole near the sidewall, I still plug it and it's good enough for me to drive to a tire place to replace the tire. I know you're not supposed to keep plugs and it's better to use a patch, but in all of these years, I've never had a single problem. A patch is expensive and a real pain. If the plug comes out, I'll pull over and put another one. I drive over 30,000 miles per year, so I can confirm that I've had zero problems doing this. Some cars I've had a full size spare, sometimes a cheap donut and even a couple cars I had no spare at all! I always bring that plug kit and tire pump with me at all times. My father-in-law must have had like 6 or 7 screws or nails in his tires that I've had to fix. He never had a problem in all of the years that I fixed his tires.
 

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The best way is a patch. I've done that a couple of times, but I've been using plugs since the 1990's and only had one problem all that time. I had a nail that was closer to the sidewall. I put the plug. It lasted for nearly a week and then it ended up leaking. I put in another plug and then I was able to make it to BJ's Wholesale and they put on a new tire for me. The point being, I never had to take the wheel off. I never needed a jack. I never needed a spare tire. Those things are a pain to change when you're on the side of the road. Not to mention can be dangerous if the car were to ever fall on you.

This has NEVER happened to me:

 

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I think we can all agree on one thing--it's NEVER a good idea to patch or plug a puncture or leak if said issue is in or pretty close to the sidewall. Also--no reputable tire shop will ever use a plug to fix a puncture, so if you're one of those folks who feel comfortable with a plug solution you pretty much have to perform the plug fix yourself.
 

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I think we can all agree on one thing--it's NEVER a good idea to patch or plug a puncture or leak if said issue is in or pretty close to the sidewall. Also--no reputable tire shop will ever use a plug to fix a puncture, so if you're one of those folks who feel comfortable with a plug solution you pretty much have to perform the plug fix yourself.
Nope. They won't for liability reasons. I had a screw in my tire and when they showed me how close it was, they told me I needed to replace the tire with a new one. It sucked because my car was 3 weeks old and I didn't want to buy another tire on a brand new car. :( They can be sued if the vehicle has a blow out. You're still missing my point. The whole idea is to totally eliminate the reason for needing a spare. If you carry a plug kit, it's good enough to get you to a place so you can replace the tire or get a proper patch installed. That's the basic purpose of a plug kit.

I've been doing it for over 25 years and have zero problems. I'm trying to teach others to keep their lives simple and be prepared. Buy a cheap tire pump and plug kit and keep it in your trunk and forget about it until one day you discover you have a flat or object in the tire. Also keep a Phillips screwdriver, flat head and needle nose pliers. It could take any combination to pull a roofing nail or screw out. Been there, done that.
 

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Not sure how exactly am I "STILL" missing your point when I hadn't commented on it prior to my last reply; I was simply stating a situation in which a plug should never be considered, not that plugs are a bad idea or should never be considered as an option.
 

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Nope. They won't for liability reasons. I had a screw in my tire and when they showed me how close it was, they told me I needed to replace the tire with a new one. It sucked because my car was 3 weeks old and I didn't want to buy another tire on a brand new car. :( They can be sued if the vehicle has a blow out. You're still missing my point. The whole idea is to totally eliminate the reason for needing a spare. If you carry a plug kit, it's good enough to get you to a place so you can replace the tire or get a proper patch installed. That's the basic purpose of a plug kit.

I've been doing it for over 25 years and have zero problems. I'm trying to teach others to keep their lives simple and be prepared. Buy a cheap tire pump and plug kit and keep it in your trunk and forget about it until one day you discover you have a flat or object in the tire. Also keep a Phillips screwdriver, flat head and needle nose pliers. It could take any combination to pull a roofing nail or screw out. Been there, done that.
Guess I need to prove everything I state, plug/patch is the required repair, not just a plug, not just a patch:
Tire Rack
Typically a mushroom-shaped patch and plug combination repair is considered to be the best method of repairing a punctured steel belted radial.

NHTSA
Repair of a punctured tire requires a plug and patch

I'm going to stop at those two, and driving around with an air pump, tools, along with some gooey leather strips to do on the road repairs in place of a spare is ridiculous. What happens when the tire defect is larger than a small puncture, or when the sidewall is damaged? I know, in 25 years it hasn't happened to you, but it's happened to a lot of other people, so w/o a spare the car is dead in the water. Call the nearest garage or AAA for flat bed.

A couple years ago a friend of ours had a flat on the way home after closing his restaurant, 2:30AM, hit something and sliced the tire, so he goes for the spare...........no spare, just a can of sealant that didn't work because of the slit, so he called a flatbed and had his $150,000+ Porsche Panamera Turbo delivered to the dealership.
 
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