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2011 Kia Optima
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Didn't listen to the entire video, only to where he was stressing that the 10k mile oil changes aren't satisfactory for engine longevity, to which I disagree, if the engine was designed properly.

Problem with Hyundai /Kia, at least the 11-20, no type of maintenance will ensure reliability. The 2.0T is a 5k mile change, the 2.4 7.5k mile change and they continue to blow up every day, block problem and even if the oil were to be changed every 3k miles, they'd still blow up.
 

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2020 Kia Soul X-Line 2.0 MPI
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148 Posts
Always do the Severe Schedule Maintenance for Oil Changes on Theta 2s.
Always use synthetic oil that's one viscosity higher than what's written on your oil cap.
Always do the oil dipstick level-check every 500 miles also. Fill as needed.

Engine may still grenade / implode. But your odds are keeping that engine running for a significantly extended period, just went up considerably.
 

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2012 Black SX Prem. & Tech.
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2,594 Posts
Would you look at that, the video highlights the problem: stuck oil control rings on the pistons!

This video highlights how it can happen on even a toyota, and is consistent with the theory that the Kia engines will fail if your oil control rings fail, which can be caused by build-up of burnt oil at the oil control ring. So I think it's very important, and possibly related, to whether your oil is getting too old, and whether you use Techron to help clear the build-up inside the cylinder.

Watch at around the 13:30 mark, he found both pistons had stuck oil control rings, and those were the pistons where the cylinder walls were worn. And at around 14:14, he shows how the rod bearings were perfectly fine, look brand-new, proving the owner took good care of the engine (ignoring the 10K oil change interval issue, but he was going by the book). At around 14:50 he explains the importance of the oil jets that cool the pistons so they don't cook the oil, but those oil jets get clogged by the old oil and varnish, so your pistons will then cook the oil.

I'd go so far as to say the oil control rings got stuck first, and then those pistons wore down their cylinder walls after.

Here is the video tagged to begin playing at the timestamp where he shows the stuck oil control rings and says how the damage to the cylinder walls was caused by the stuck oil control rings:
 

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2017 Optima EX
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218 Posts
Coked up oil scavenge rings on Toyota engines is a very very well known issue. For years. They get clogged from crap oil they scuff the cylinder wall and then you have a little oil eating monster. A LOEM.

You have a modern car owner especially younger who never ever ever checks there engine oil level and has no idea they own a LOEM And the engine is almost out of oil. Till they hear weird noises that are usually the piston rod bearing that’s the first to go as it’s the highest bearing in the engine. Engine oil starvation. Knock knock whose there…..oh hi it’s an engine replacement.

Also This whole blown engine scenario is greatly exacerbated by dealer only oil changes. That’s a death sentence for your car really.
if you throw them the keys your getting the cheap ass vat oil. They never check the oil level when you roll in as they don’t give a **** and there not ASE mechanics there minimum wage dudes. Back in the oil pit with the vats. You will never know you rolled in down 3 quarts.
and the absolute worst thing isDealer oil change removes all responsibility in the mind of the owner to open the hood on a regular schedule to check all the fluids.
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Why should they it’s serviced at the mother ship. They checked it all over I’m cool. Life is good. Which is ludicrous.

Im on alot of car forums and the my car has run out of oil mystery is very common. And all have the same owner issue they never ever check there oil and know nothing about oil quality,
Most new forum posters when they think the engine is acting up will go through the trouble of joining a car forum and post about it before they even open the hood.

Anyway there’s many ways I have seen to loosen up the clogged rings using various chemicals like Berrymans piston soak etc but most of the time the cylinder walls are worn. Borescope to check.

I do know one thing for sure on a Toyota if you use a really high quality oil a good OCI and religiously keep it at the full line you will not experience the clogged oil ring issue. I know that for a fact cause I owned one and did that and it never ate a drop of oil and you could eat off the valve valley.
 

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2012 Black SX Prem. & Tech.
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Anyway there’s many ways I have seen to loosen up the clogged rings using various chemicals like Berrymans piston soak etc but most of the time the cylinder walls are worn. Borescope to check.
I'm thinking about inspecting my cylinder walls to see if there is any wear spots that would explain the oil consumption. If there are worn spots, would you say it would be a waste to try the chemicals/additives to loosen clogged rings?

Or is there a value to trying the chemicals regardless of cylinder wall condition? I worry there is a risk with the chemicals, because you might loosen something that causes a clog somewhere else, or it might attack the oil seals and cause oil leaks.
 

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2017 Optima EX
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218 Posts
Hi King

You never posted the mileage on the car. And what kind of oil did you use?

I have never had to do this to a car but go over to Priuschat.com and join and use there search forum link and search for it. Lots of guys over there with stuck rings on there Toyota G2 prius.

Lots of posts about piston soaks and what worked best.

I bought a 2007 Prius brand new and 14 years later at 175,000 miles it did not eat any oil. Everyone else is eating oil and clogged rings. The difference is I used really high quality oil. Toyota's do not like shitty oil. It will clog the rings. pretty much the same for every modern car.

Redline 5-30 and engine at 155,000 miles:
 

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2011 Kia Optima
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The difference is I used really high quality oil. Toyota's do not like shitty oil. It will clog the rings. pretty much the same for every modern car.
Redline 5-30 and engine at 155,000 miles:
Hate to be the proverbial PIA, but I guess the question would be if RedLine oil isn't used why don't all the Toyota engines fail?
Same with Hyundai/Kia, no matter what oil is used, some engines fail some don't, and that's been proven.

Here's the '08 2.4 with 294,000 miles, any oil/filter on sale, changed every 7500 miles:
White Light Black Automotive tire Mass production
 
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