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2013 Kia Optima SXL
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I just bought the ADD W1 V3 catch can from the k5 store, I have a few questions.

1. Is there a better side to put intake or pcv side?
2.i see some people get 2, why is 2 needed
3. I see a lot of people saying the hoses you get with it do not match to what you need. What are the correct hoses and sizes?
4. Lastly is there any videos showing to install it? I've seen for the mounting bracket but not for the catch can itself.
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
2017 Tesla Model X
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28,442 Posts
Thank you for your purchase with us.

We would be happy to help answer any questions you have.

Please feel free to reach out to us here directly through email as well.

1) Absolutely 100% would be the PCV side. (Passenger side)

2) This is because on your SX-L there is oil blow-by on both the PCV & CCV sides of the engine. Having (1) oil catch can to collect the oil caking up on your valves is better than not having a catch can at all, but having a 2nd catch can on the CCV side (Intake side) of the engine is better than just having (1) installed.

3) Once you receive the product, it should include the correct hoses for your vehicle if you bought the vehicle specific catch can. (V3.3) If you bought the universal V3 catch can, then it may not include the exact hose sizes you need for your particular setup.

4) I am not aware of any videos, but if you run into any issues, you can reach out to us through email for support, and we can put you in direct contact with the manufacturer so they can assist you with how to install it properly and answer any technical questions you may have.
 

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2013 Kia Optima SXL
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your purchase with us.

We would be happy to help answer any questions you have.

Please feel free to reach out to us here directly through email as well.

1) Absolutely 100% would be the PCV side. (Passenger side)

2) This is because on your SX-L there is oil blow-by on both the PCV & CCV sides of the engine. Having (1) oil catch can to collect the oil caking up on your valves is better than not having a catch can at all, but having a 2nd catch can on the CCV side (Intake side) of the engine is better than just having (1) installed.

3) Once you receive the product, it should include the correct hoses for your vehicle if you bought the vehicle specific catch can. (V3.3) If you bought the universal V3 catch can, then it may not include the exact hose sizes you need for your particular setup.

4) I am not aware of any videos, but if you run into any issues, you can reach out to us through email for support, and we can put you in direct contact with the manufacturer so they can assist you with how to install it properly and answer any technical questions you may have.
I'm still confused, what's the difference between the intake and the pcv side? How do I tell which hoses to use? And you said installing it on the pcv side is better. Why?
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
2017 Tesla Model X
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28,442 Posts
I'm still confused, what's the difference between the intake and the pcv side? How do I tell which hoses to use? And you said installing it on the pcv side is better. Why?
Give us a call here if you would like further assistance on this, as this could take awhile to type it all out here.

(213) 785-7512

Otherwise, the catch can will come with instructions inside of the box on how to install it, and you can find a ton of information on why the PCV side is better online.
 

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2013 Kia Optima SXL
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
UPDATE: I got it installed to the pcv system, but I still do not get why it's better to install it for that rather than the intake system. I've been browsing all over and still can not find much why the pcv is better than the intake.
 

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2011 Kia Optima
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UPDATE: I got it installed to the pcv system, but I still do not get why it's better to install it for that rather than the intake system. I've been browsing all over and still can not find much why the pcv is better than the intake.
The engine produces gases and they need to be evacuated and that's where the PCV valve comes into play.
The engine receives "fresh" air through the intake air hose attached to the large intake tube and valve cover, and as the "blowby" gases are created inside the engine vacuum pulls this product from the engine through the PCV valve and into the intake manifold. These contaminated gases have particles of oil so when a catch can is installed, the contaminates are deposited within the catch can and what we might say, clean air is sent through the intake manifold, and as the contaminates are retained in the catch can there is no oil that will buildup on the intake valves. This has become a problem with the direct injection engines as the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder and no fuel is cleaning the intake valve as in the past. Believe Kia will finally join the group, and in the future the direct injected engine will receive an additional injector, a low pressure injector before the intake valve whose job will be to keep the intake valve clean.

As far as a catch can on the clean side, fresh air hose, some feel if a catch can were installed it would stop any blow-back, mostly on the the 2.0T, but when I checked the fresh air hose on our 2.0T with 172,000 miles, there was virtually no sediment within that hose, so I wouldn't bother.
Also, depending on the type of catch can used on the "clean" side, I'd be wary of creating/altering any changes in that system. I haven't done this because I feel it's not necessary, but one could just place a one-way valve inside the fresh air hose and that would stop any "blow-back" air into the large fresh air intake tube. I'm not a big fan of these one way valves as it would difficult to know when the valve becomes contaminated and ceases to function.

Time for breakfast.
 

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2013 Kia Optima SXL
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The engine produces gases and they need to be evacuated and that's where the PCV valve comes into play.
The engine receives "fresh" air through the intake air hose attached to the large intake tube and valve cover, and as the "blowby" gases are created inside the engine vacuum pulls this product from the engine through the PCV valve and into the intake manifold. These contaminated gases have particles of oil so when a catch can is installed, the contaminates are deposited within the catch can and what we might say, clean air is sent through the intake manifold, and as the contaminates are retained in the catch can there is no oil that will buildup on the intake valves. This has become a problem with the direct injection engines as the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder and no fuel is cleaning the intake valve as in the past. Believe Kia will finally join the group, and in the future the direct injected engine will receive an additional injector, a low pressure injector before the intake valve whose job will be to keep the intake valve clean.

As far as a catch can on the clean side, fresh air hose, some feel if a catch can were installed it would stop any blow-back, mostly on the the 2.0T, but when I checked the fresh air hose on our 2.0T with 172,000 miles, there was virtually no sediment within that hose, so I wouldn't bother.
Also, depending on the type of catch can used on the "clean" side, I'd be wary of creating/altering any changes in that system. I haven't done this because I feel it's not necessary, but one could just place a one-way valve inside the fresh air hose and that would stop any "blow-back" air into the large fresh air intake tube. I'm not a big fan of these one way valves as it would difficult to know when the valve becomes contaminated and ceases to function.

Time for breakfast.
Okay, that makes more sense! Thank you
 
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