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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in September 2018 I received a recall notice on my 2012 Kia Optima for the Brake Pedal Stopper Pad, but under "What should you do" section it stated to regularly check to see if the Stop Lamps remain illuminated after the brake pedal has been released. So this statement assumes that Kia will not replace the faulty part until it fails. I had my Optima in for normal service a couple of times after receiving this recall notice and actually had another recall item corrected. I looked at the issue a bit and eventually had to remove the Stop Lamp fuse in order to remove power from the Stop Lamps. I also started getting an intermittent Electronic Traction Control light displayed, but assumed these issues were related. The next day I had my Son follow me closely to the dealership to have this recall corrected. After about an hour the Service Rep gave me some disturbing news that they found multiple items burned out (Stop Switch, Relay, and burnt wiring). The cost to repair these items was going to be around $545. Needless to say I was not happy, since I believed this was caused by the Stop Lights remaining on for long periods. The Service Rep maintained he could not authorize the repairs covered under the recall, so my only option was to file a claim with Kia Consumer Service. Has anyone else had this recall performed or the actual failure mode associated with it?
 

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Just nitpicking on my part but the notice you brought up is technically a TSB rather than a formal recall--if it was a true recall then they are required to replace/fix the item/issue regardless of whether it shows signs of failure. That the dealer would not replace it unless/until it fails is par for the course and not unwarranted; the ideal situation for them would be that the part fails AFTER your manufacturer or extended warranty expires, so that they then are not required to fix/replace it for free regardless of the fact that the issue is described in a TSB. If your warranty has expired, then you could try to get the dealer to goodwill the TSB fix but they are under no legal obligation to do so (fix it for free despite the existence of the TSB for it).

However, there is hope for you--this Notice might help you out (not sure if this is the notice that you were referring to):

Brake Stopper Pad extended warranty

Although again, application of the warranty would be based on evidence of actual failure of the stopper pad...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just nitpicking on my part but the notice you brought up is technically a TSB rather than a formal recall--if it was a true recall then they are required to replace/fix the item/issue regardless of whether it shows signs of failure. That the dealer would not replace it unless/until it fails is par for the course and not unwarranted; the ideal situation for them would be that the part fails AFTER your manufacturer or extended warranty expires, so that they then are not required to fix/replace it for free regardless of the fact that the issue is described in a TSB. If your warranty has expired, then you could try to get the dealer to goodwill the TSB fix but they are under no legal obligation to do so (fix it for free despite the existence of the TSB for it).

However, there is hope for you--this Notice might help you out (not sure if this is the notice that you were referring to):

Brake Stopper Pad extended warranty

Although again, application of the warranty would be based on evidence of actual failure of the stopper pad...
You are correct, it was not an official recall. Probably should have been as they put my family in danger by driving without knowing the brake lights were not functioning properly. Fortunately, we did catch the problem rather quickly. Now that I have the vehicle back along with the replaced parts, I have found that they deceived me and most, if not all of the parts replaced are very much functional and should not have been replaced. I can understand from a dealer point of view why they replaced them (CYA), but this should also have been covered under the "Limited Warranty Extension" since the root cause of the issue was the faulty part in the notice (Stopper). We will see how the Kia Consumer Service Case turns out as the service Rep says it is out of their hands and can only cover the stopper replacement. Total cost of repair $485.46 and 3 days without the vehicle.
 

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I disagree with one of your premises - that the stop lights remaining on for long periods would result in burned out Stop Switch, Relay, and wiring.

I'm unaware of the actual wattage/amp rating, but I think it's total BS invented problems by the dealership, pulling a fast one where they figure out any and all components that are related, and assume they are all broken/burnt out.

If that premise were true, then the instruction manuals would come with a notice saying not to hold your brake pedal more than X minutes or your car will fail and require costly repairs. Rather, I feel like the lights are designed to be on indefinitely, ESPECIALLY the brake lights. Sorry but I bet your original parts were perfectly fine, and it's likely they weren't even replaced.

I was victimized this way one time (telling me my oil pan bolt was stripped and I needed a new oil pan, when that was totally invented because it was a standard TSB issue with the leaky gasket), but I knew my car and just said I didn't have the money, then verified they were lying. Then years later they lied directly to my face again (saying they replaced the steering coupling under TSB with documentation and everything, when really they lied and I verified by removing the old one myself, see my separate post), and that's where I figured it must be a standard strategy, just doing normal business. The first approach is to say everything needs to be replaced, kind of like how anyone would negotiate in a sale by underbidding first, to see how low the seller will go. Here, the dealership overbids first, to see how high the customer will go. I'm sure it's infrequent when people take back there car and actually verify they were lied to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I disagree with one of your premises - that the stop lights remaining on for long periods would result in burned out Stop Switch, Relay, and wiring.

I'm unaware of the actual wattage/amp rating, but I think it's total BS invented problems by the dealership, pulling a fast one where they figure out any and all components that are related, and assume they are all broken/burnt out.

If that premise were true, then the instruction manuals would come with a notice saying not to hold your brake pedal more than X minutes or your car will fail and require costly repairs. Rather, I feel like the lights are designed to be on indefinitely, ESPECIALLY the brake lights. Sorry but I bet your original parts were perfectly fine, and it's likely they weren't even replaced.

I was victimized this way one time (telling me my oil pan bolt was stripped and I needed a new oil pan, when that was totally invented because it was a standard TSB issue with the leaky gasket), but I knew my car and just said I didn't have the money, then verified they were lying. Then years later they lied directly to my face again (saying they replaced the steering coupling under TSB with documentation and everything, when really they lied and I verified by removing the old one myself, see my separate post), and that's where I figured it must be a standard strategy, just doing normal business. The first approach is to say everything needs to be replaced, kind of like how anyone would negotiate in a sale by underbidding first, to see how low the seller will go. Here, the dealership overbids first, to see how high the customer will go. I'm sure it's infrequent when people take back there car and actually verify they were lied to.
You are correct in that the dealership is assuming all these parts are bad and they lied to me on the condition of these parts. I have the old parts in hand and I have tested all but the relay and they are all functional. Wiring harness has slight discoloration, but not melted/burnt as was described and Brake Light Switch is fully functional. My premise is based on if all they told me was true, then the faulty stopper pad causing the lights to stay on would be the root cause of all the other parts the dealership believed they needed to replace and therefore should have been covered by the extended warranty as referenced by the TSB.
 

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Hwy Star--hope Kia makes things right for you; that the dealer would state that those issues were due to the stop (I presume by "stop" you mean brake) lights being on for extended periods and insinuate that somehow you managed to do something that kept the stop lights on is ridiculous IMHO. What--does the dealer think that somehow you must have been riding the brake pedal?
 

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I'm unconvinced on the whole multiple things burnt out and agree with you they were probably replaced unnecessarily. This just happened to me last week, exactly the same issue on a 2012 SX. Brake lights staying on, traction control light permanantly on and even randomly losing power. It's an easy fix, I'm not that mechanically inclined and it took maybe 15 mins with minimal swearing involved. The first link below is what I did because I could not find an auto parts store locally that had the exact part and I didn't want to wait for the dealer to open the next day.


This is the actual part is you want to do it "properly", following the same basic procedure as above.

It sucks but I feel like they took you for a ride. Secondly, the design of the stopper is stupid. The brake switch had worn a hole clean into the pad that is made of relatively soft rubber. What did they think was going to happen?
 

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It wouldn't surprise me if the factory only reimburses a fraction of what the repair actually costs the dealer, so the dealer is resorted to these tactics to avoid losing money.
 

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Hmm, I would think there is a certain amount of fairness that comes into play, like there is an agreed-upon rate and agreed-upon hours estimate, like a schedule, that Kia corporate makes sure to pay a fair amount.

Are you saying you trust the dealership more than you trust Kia corporate? All my experience says the opposite is the case. Every time I go to the dealership they lie to me or otherwise try to swindle me in some manner. But Kia corporate is usually fair and not trying to be sneaky, incompetent, or flat out liars the way the dealership is.
 
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