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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to order a can with the petcock/drain hose to alleviate the need to split the body to empty, but question is stage 1/stage 2. Do know the Stage 2 has 2 inlets, one for the PCV side, one for the intake, and one for exit, and about $100 more than stage 1. Why can't one take a Stage 1, on exit use a short hose, then a Y connection for the two hoses?
 

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I've been reading up a bit more on OCCs and noticed that there are apparently two types of dual-OCCs--one like the ADD v3.3 that has two inlet ports; the other type in which there are two outlet ports. In both cases there is a hose connecting the PCV and OCC (this connection is universal regardless of single or dual OCC), one connecting the OCC to the intake manifold (where the hose from the PCV would normally connect to on a non-OCC setup), and one connecting the OCC to a spot upstream of the throttle body (this is labeled an "out" on certain OCCs but is labeled an "in" on an ADD v3.3 OCC). Not sure if this is just simply a manufacturer choice in identifying what each of the vacuum hoses are but am curious to understand if these two types of dual-whatever OCCs are essentially one and the same.

I also learned/read that single-inlet/valve OCCs are really only effective when the engine is at idle speeds, and do very little to filter dirty air/oil mixture coming from the PCV when engine is not at idle (IOW, typical driving/acceleration)--hence why dual-valve OCCs would be a more-preferable choice, especially for forced-induction engines like those in Optimas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We have a vacuum pump on the 2.0 T so that would keep the lines flowing with oil/mist.

I also made an error in the post. The stage 2 has 2 inlets, one outlet so take a stage 1 and split the hose at the inlet not exit with the y and and use the stage 1,1 inlet 1 outlet.
 

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So, are we at making a 2-Inlet / 1-Outlet OCC from the ADD V3, not 3.3, with the Y Connector?
My V 3.3 notes show Inlets at Both 9 mm and 15 mm.
HOW does the 3/8 in Y-Connector accommodate Both Sizes.

ANY chance the size/design physics of the v3 with a Y (Vs) 3.3 2-Inlets is such the V3 wouldn't suck in junk AT Non-IDLE as well as the 3.3.?

On the Drain Hose: you install the metal Drain Valve to bottom of OCC and when ready to Drain, fish the hose down thru the engine to ground and connect last end to OCC bottom Drain Valve? Turn knob or lever to drain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was just thinking out loud, and threw it out there so as one might get by with a less expensive OCC, and they do have Y adapters that will accommodate various hose sizes, but rather than screwing around with adapters etc, I went with the "stage 2", 2 inlet, 1 outlet w/drain kit. I'm going to leave the drain hose in place and plug the end of the hose so as to keep oil from dripping/dirt from entering.
 

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For any who get the V3.3, I have another old note ref -- Breather -- in the 3.3 Pkg .... that states -- IF the OCC is installed on Passenger side of engine area (aren't 99%) -- you CANNOT use the breather. Breather = ?? ... FYI IF Still True....... IS This relevant or does it really matter.........
 

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I'm curious as to what is to be done with the original vacuum hose that you'd have to disconnect from upstream of the throttle body in order to connect the second inlet vacuum line from the TB to the V3.3 OCC? I see two vacuum hoses that connect just upstream of the TB--one hose is connected to the valve cover on the opposite end of the PCV valve, the other hose I can't quite easily see where the other end is connecting to, but in any case which of these two hoses going into the TB area would I need to disconnect for the V3.3 OCC?

What's even just as puzzling is that on the K5OS site, there are pics from two different customers with V3.3 OCC installs that show different hose connection setups--i.e., one of these two customers appears to have connected one of the hoses incorrectly.
 

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I'm curious as to what is to be done with the original vacuum hose that you'd have to disconnect from upstream of the throttle body in order to connect the second inlet vacuum line from the TB to the V3.3 OCC? I see two vacuum hoses that connect just upstream of the TB--one hose is connected to the valve cover on the opposite end of the PCV valve, the other hose I can't quite easily see where the other end is connecting to, but in any case which of these two hoses going into the TB area would I need to disconnect for the V3.3 OCC?

What's even just as puzzling is that on the K5OS site, there are pics from two different customers with V3.3 OCC installs that show different hose connection setups--i.e., one of these two customers appears to have connected one of the hoses incorrectly.
Somebody answer Tonester first ....................

but Turbonut, relevant or not, the Breather is in the K5 Store v3.3 "Package Includes" list .....................
  • 2x 15mm high-performance vacuum hoses
  • 2x check valves
  • 1x breather
  • Installation Instructions (Included in the box)
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Guys the 3.3 comes with check valves and a breather filter, you cannot just use a Y adapter to accomplish the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There is no external filter, just an internal filter they describe, and not so sure you couldn't incorporate a Y fiitting as even the V1 universal states it has an internal baffled dual chamber filter catch on their $86 unit.
 

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There is no external filter, just an internal filter they describe, and not so sure you couldn't incorporate a Y fiitting as even the V1 universal states it has an internal baffled dual chamber filter catch on their $86 unit.
That depends on which Catch can from ADD W1 you are referring too.

Please note, before getting into a debate about this, I personally worked with the manufacturer myself to help develop the ADD W1 V3.3 (Which does include an external breather filter)

The ADD W1 V1, V2 & V3 DO NOT include check valves or an external breather filter, however, as mentioned above, the V3.3 absolutely does.
 

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COS-16SXL--based on your pics it looks like for the V3.3 OCC one inlet is from the PCV valve (duh), the other inlet is where the factory breather hose connects into the port opposite the PCV valve (what I alluded to in my previous post), and the OCC outlet hose runs to where the other end of the factory breather hose connects to (upstream of the TB).

So if I got it right, the V3.3 OCC install goes like this:

1) Disconnect factory hose from PCV valve (it is located on the front end of the rocker cover facing towards the front of the vehicle)--do not disconnect the other end of this hose that connects to the intake manifold unless you intend to replace it with a shorter-length hose (if you do decide to swap the factory hose out make sure you don't discard it in case you need to put everything back to stock)
2) Run supplied OCC 9mm kit hose from PCV valve to the corresponding OCC inlet (I believe it's the smaller diameter inlet but I'm sure the instructions will indicate which one)
3) Disconnect factory breather hose from the port on the rocker cover that is located opposite of the PCV valve, and disconnect the other end of this hose from the port upstream of the TB--this hose won't be used for the OCC install but keep it in a safe place in case you need to put everything back to stock
4) Run supplied OCC 15mm kit hose (I'm not sure if the two supplied 15mm kit hoses are of different lengths but I reckon you should be able to figure out which one of the two 15mm hoses to use in this step) from breather hose port on rocker cover to the larger-diameter OCC inlet
5) Run the second supplied OCC 15mm kit hose from OCC outlet to the upstream port near the TB where you previously disconnected the other end of the factory breather hose in Step #3
6) Connect the supplied OCC breather filter to the end of the factory hose that you disconnected from the PCV valve since the other end of this hose is (still) connected to the intake manifold. This breather filter is needed since it essentially plugs the end of the factory hose that you disconnected from the PCV valve--otherwise undesired stuff may wind up entering the intake manifold through the open end of the hose if not plugged.

Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong but I think the locations of the OCC hose connections make sense.
 

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COS-16SXL--based on your pics it looks like for the V3.3 OCC one inlet is from the PCV valve (duh), the other inlet is where the factory breather hose connects into the port opposite the PCV valve (what I alluded to in my previous post), and the OCC outlet hose runs to where the other end of the factory breather hose connects to (upstream of the TB).

So if I got it right, the V3.3 OCC install goes like this:

1) Disconnect factory hose from PCV valve (it is located on the front end of the rocker cover facing towards the front of the vehicle)--do not disconnect the other end of this hose that connects to the intake manifold unless you intend to replace it with a shorter-length hose (if you do decide to swap the factory hose out make sure you don't discard it in case you need to put everything back to stock)
2) Run supplied OCC 9mm kit hose from PCV valve to the corresponding OCC inlet (I believe it's the smaller diameter inlet but I'm sure the instructions will indicate which one)
3) Disconnect factory breather hose from the port on the rocker cover that is located opposite of the PCV valve, and disconnect the other end of this hose from the port upstream of the TB--this hose won't be used for the OCC install but keep it in a safe place in case you need to put everything back to stock
4) Run supplied OCC 15mm kit hose (I'm not sure if the two supplied 15mm kit hoses are of different lengths but I reckon you should be able to figure out which one of the two 15mm hoses to use in this step) from breather hose port on rocker cover to the larger-diameter OCC inlet
5) Run the second supplied OCC 15mm kit hose from OCC outlet to the upstream port near the TB where you previously disconnected the other end of the factory breather hose in Step #3
6) Connect the supplied OCC breather filter to the end of the factory hose that you disconnected from the PCV valve since the other end of this hose is (still) connected to the intake manifold. This breather filter is needed since it essentially plugs the end of the factory hose that you disconnected from the PCV valve--otherwise undesired stuff may wind up entering the intake manifold through the open end of the hose if not plugged.

Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong but I think the locations of the OCC hose connections make sense.
https://----- www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx4gKenwvGE

My Pics came from this 31-second YouTube "Optima Finished Install V3.3" . (Del URL dashes above to open)

Can David or any K5 rep, or V3.3 user confirm tonester's Install Description.
Surely is a good V3.3 template for something that has never been described as such until now.

Different people use Different Location Terms, but this From a V3.3 installer's post notes -- NOT sure if He & tonester are saying the same things = TBD.
The dual inlets are connected to the (1) PCV valve and the (2) crankcase breather.
The Outlet is connected to the air intake to provide vacuum.
The PCV hose removed from the PCV valve will be plugged.

Per THIS JPG the Shortest Hose is the 9 mm Inlet Hose (PCV Valve);
The Shortest 15 mm Hose is the 2nd Inlet Hose (Crankcase Breather) , and the LONGEST 15 mm Hose is the Output House (Air Intake).

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
If my scanner was working I'd post, but.............
The templates with the unit:
One hose from PCV valve into single port while 2 hoses exit the OCC with check valves, one to intake PCV hose entry at the intake, and one into the air intake before the turbo. There are 2 options for the line going into the air intake before the turbo, the kit comes with a filter that can be attached to the plastic nipple coming out of the valve cover after the line is removed and replaced by the hose OCC to the air intake, or a hose can be used at that plastic nipple and "Teed" into the replacement line, OCC to air intake.

What seems redundant is the use of the PCV valve if it's retained, then 2 check valves in exit lines. Guess I'll need to look at that.

Thinking about the set up, I realize not much oil is sent into the air intake system, but with a turbo it happens, so if one would use the T as suggested, that in itself would allow oil/mist to still enter the intake, so why even remove and replace with the OCC. Personally don't like the setup and I can see why people opt to use the 2 OCC's, or guess stay with the filter which I don't care for.

Maybe I'm missing something.
 

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This might help understand how a dual-valve OCC (like the V3.3) functions and the benefits of using one vs. a single-valve OCC (note--I am not a shill for the product mentioned in the links below but am simply providing the links that explain in better detail as to how a dual-valve OCC works):

Dual-valve OCC dynamics

Better description with OCC diagram

Note again that in the above link it mentions that (their) dual-valve OCC has one inlet and two outlets vs. the V3.3 OCC having two inlets and one outlet. What's interesting here is that their dual-valve OCC apparently doesn't bypass the connection to the intake manifold like how the V3.3 does by plugging it with the breather filter kit. IOW in their kit the inlet is from PCV to OCC, one outlet is from OCC to intake manifold, the other outlet is from OCC to the inlet port upstream of the TB; I imagine then you'd use a breather filter kit like the one supplied with the V3.3 to plug the breather port on the valve cover, otherwise you'd have to tap into the inlet port using a T-fitting (or otherwise drill into your intake tube and insert a hose barb fitting there).

COS-16SXL--I've seen that diagram before, and in light of my possibly-correct instructions on where all of the hose connections go on a V3.3, that diagram makes sense now, notwithstanding the possibility that that diagram may be a generic representation of where all of the hoses connect to--for the 2.0T the valve cover breather hose port is actually opposite (and a wee bit towards the upper-right) of the PCV valve port rather than on the right-hand side of the valve cover as depicted in the diagram. I don't think you can miss it, as I believe it's the only other vacuum hose besides the one for the PCV valve coming out of the top-side of the valve cover, connecting on the other end to the air intake tube just upstream of the TB.

Then again, in the two links above one might argue that it makes more sense to connect the hoses in the way described in the links and use the V3.3 breather filter kit to plug the breather port on the valve cover rather than use it to plug the hose going to the intake manifold, as you would need vacuum to pull the dirty oil/air mixture from the PCV valve end at both idle and at WOT/acceleration and apparently the vacuum from the intake manifold isn't enough to pull dirty air at WOT. I would think most of the dirty oil/air would be coming from the PCV valve compared to that coming out of the breather port, hence why one could get away with using just the breather filter kit to plug the breather port. But hey, I suppose we should go with what David says since he worked with ADD on developing the V3.3...
 

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Turbonut--I reckon that with a traditional two-OCC single-in/single-out setup, one OCC takes care of the blow-by coming from/through the PCV valve when at idle, and the other OCC takes care of blow-by coming from the breather port when at WOT? I suppose one needs to ask as to where most of the oil/air mixture is coming from (i.e., from PCV valve or from breather port?), and if most of it is pulled into the OCC when at WOT vs. idle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes, it seems as though the dual is another marketing gimmick as the hose from the occ to air intake is really not needed, so why screw around with the t connection and the filter is ridiculous as any blow by oil/most will just flood the filter. Why can't one just place a one way check valve in the factory hose and be done with it. With a check valve, only fresh clean air will be supplied into the motor and any blow by gases won't be able to go past the check valve into the fresh air intake.
On the other end, just cut the hose from pcv valve and attach it to the occ inlet and the other part of the cut hose to the exit and be done with it

Anybody want to buy a new ADD W1 V3.3 with the optional drain package?
 

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Well if you think about how the whole PCV system is supposed to work--the breather hose is there to pull (fresh) air coming from the air intake tube into the valve cover/crankcase to help evacuate the air/blow-by from the crankcase via the PCV valve; IOW there should be no blow-by coming from the breather hose since otherwise you'd have a system where blow-by is coming out from both the breather port AND the PCV valve which I'm fairly certain is not how a PCV system is supposed to function; the crankcase would "starve" from lack of air, so to speak, if there is no air entering the crankcase to create the positive air pressure needed to push the blow-by out through the PCV valve.

Honestly I think this is how the V3.3 should be hooked up--one hose from PCV to OCC, another hose from OCC to intake manifold, the third hose from OCC to air intake tube opening where the breather hose connected into, then connect supplied(?) breather filter to the breather port on the valve cover which would then allow the crankcase to breathe, albeit by pulling in air from the engine compartment rather than from the air intake tube.

Yes what I just described is different from the ADD V3.3 diagram; the diagram makes sense, but only IF the hose going from the OCC to the breather port on the valve cover actually functions as an "outlet" since again air needs to go into the crankcase in order for blow-by to be properly evacuated via the PCV valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
First, who would want a filter sticking out of the vc and one that certainly needs maintenance how often, and what does one clean it with, or just replace??
Also, don't forget the pcv valve is not opened all the time, only at idle/low speeds as when the car is up to speed pressure is higher in the manifold and the pcv system isn't needed as the high pressure keeps the "blowby" in the depths of the engine, and therefore the fresh air intake into the engine isn't utilized constantly.

Guess well see.
 
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