Kia Optima Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
2013 Kia Optima
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
anyone has installed this catch can on their Optima. Mine is SX 2013 with V1 of the ADD catch can. Wonder if getting V3.3 helps even more.....and how the **** they pipe it as it shows 1 intake 2 exhausts....
 

·
Registered
2011 Kia Optima
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
I purchased the unit, but only used the intake side and put a vacuum cap over the other exit, just my opinion on the clean side. I also didn't use the one way valve as really don't know what it's supposed to do?I know it's function, but the PCV valve already has that job so why have another that could clog and not function as it should. My opinion, purchase a simple cc, 1 in 1 out that contains a filter to dispurse the contaminants. Oh and for the clean side one could just install a one way valve into the clean air factory tube and be down with it. Actually on my 2.0T there wasn't much oil in that side.
 

·
Your K5 Optima Vendor
2017 Tesla Model X
Joined
·
28,707 Posts
The V3.3 will help more than the V1, as the baffle is much more improved, and it routes contents inside from both the PCV & CCV sides of the engine.

Prior to having a dual inlet catch can, members would install (2) separate catch cans, and while it's true that the PCV side will collect more, it is still beneficial to collect oil from the other side of the engine as well, to prevent carbon build up.

The product will include a detailed installation guide showing how to route the hoses for the install.

Just let us know if you have any questions about it before ordering.
 

·
Registered
2018 Kia Optima
Joined
·
940 Posts
The one main "downside" to using an OCC like the V3.3 is that installation of such will result in a open-loop crankcase system since the OEM hose that goes from the CCV to the air intake is replaced with a breather filter on the CCV side--this setup could potentially be a violation which may cause you to fail the visual part of a smog inspection (depending on which state you live in), and which may also explain why on the V3.3 packaging it states "for off-road use only" (or similar wording). IMHO--unless money is no object and/or you drive your GDI turbo car really hard on a somewhat-frequent basis, you can probably get by with one single-in/single-out OCC connected between PCV and intake manifold.
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
I just installed the V3.3, I was also wondering if venting to air had any advantage or if I should have just bought 2 catch cans. In the end it came out looking good, nice clean setup. If it wasn't for the clamp's it would almost look stock.

The only PIA was getting the clip released under the intake manifold, because it was pointed down. The rest was extremely easy.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
2013 Kia Optima
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the pics...guess now we wait for your update on the next oilchange to see how much you capture and if any check engine gets activated or if the engine bay gets too dirty due to the breather.

One idea i had was to connect the PCV end with the "breather" end as ONE to the Intake side of the catch can (maybe with a oneway valve) and then the exhaust tubes as you do...that way there's no vacuum missing
..at least that's my way of thinking

btw...what about the tube (as seen in your pic) coming from the right side of the intake manifold?
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
I'll keep you up dated.. Was going to check the level of fluid after 2 weeks.
As for the right side line into the intake manifold I haven't investigated it. I just followed the provided instructions that came with the setup. When I purchased the unit I figured it would be setup with 1 vacuum source from the pre turbo intake with the 2 outlets vented into the catch can, so I was little surprised by the installation instructions. That's on me for not digging deeper into the setup.
I don't know what the theory/R&D is on this setup. If you wanted consistent vacuum, why not connect to the intake pre-turbo(Like I've seen on other setups). Maybe this setup provides a more consistent vacuum under load?
 

·
Registered
2013 Kia Optima
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
i've read that the PCV & pre Turbo inlet run at different PSI/moments...one is regular driving and the other is on hard Open-Throttle situation....Now: which one is what I've to still find out.

Wish there were more people adding Vids in youtube for both installation and time after.
 

·
Registered
2011 Kia Optima
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
^ Well, the clean side has engine vacuum that sucks the clean air in from the intake tube into the engine, while the PCV valve sees intake vacuum that sucks the dirty air out of the engine into the intake. That's the complete cycle.

Also, as far as engine vacuum, unlike most cars that create vacuum, the 2.0T can't create enough vacuum so there's a vacuum pump installed so vacuum shouldn't be a problem.

Hope that answers some question/concerns.
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
So I understand what you're saying.
The clean side (pre-turbo) struggles to create a strong enough vacuum?
While intake manifold inlet provides a stronger vacuum, created by a pump? So is this vacuum always present even under boost?
 

·
Registered
2011 Kia Optima
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
No, the little engine needs the pump to supply vacuum to the brake booster, but under heavy throttle the pcv valve is shall we say almost closed becaus of vacuum dropping, and when the "blowby" builds up this is where the system can push the dirty air back into the air intake.

I did want to add as this is the rerason I stated that the 2 exits make no sense as when under heavy throttle, the PCV valve is only slightly opened so 2 exits on the CC doesn't mean squat as there's not much entering the can from the PCV valve, but once the throttle is shall we say released, the flow once again begins.
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
No, the little engine needs the pump to supply vacuum to the brake booster, but under heavy throttle the pcv valve is shall we say almost closed becaus of vacuum dropping, and when the "blowby" builds up this is where the system can push the dirty air back into the air intake.

I did want to add as this is the rerason I stated that the 2 exits make no sense as when under heavy throttle, the PCV valve is only slightly opened so 2 exits on the CC doesn't mean squat as there's not much entering the can from the PCV valve, but once the throttle is shall we say released, the flow once again begins.
Wouldn't the second exit provide a vacuum at the PCV under heavy throttle that's usually not present with a single exit system. Thus holding the PCV open allowing gases to exhaust immediately vs waiting for a low throttle event? Reducing the buildup of pressure.
 

·
Registered
2011 Kia Optima
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
I'd say no as that air moving through the air intake tube certainly doesn't have the ability to overcome the pcv spring pressure and if that valve were held open the a/f ratio would become out of wack as the tube from the OCC also goes to the intake.

Just an example, the air moving through the air intake tube doesn't have that type of vacuum as the clean air is sucked from that tube into the valve cover so as the dirty air can be drawn out.
 

·
Your K5 Optima Vendor
2017 Tesla Model X
Joined
·
28,707 Posts
If you have questions about how to plumb the hoses or how the system is designed to work properly, I would highly recommend simply emailing the manufacturer at ADD W1 directly.

You can reach Jack at [email protected] and he is more than happy to assist with answering questions that anyone has.

Many times different people will have different opinions on what they think is the right way or the wrong way to do something.

However, by checking with the manufacturer of the product, the one who engineered and designed it, you are guaranteed to get the most accurate information.
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
It would be interesting to see how much vacuum the venturi effect causes in the turbo feed tube and how much vacuum is needed to hold the PCV open. I don't have a vacuum gauge to test, I believe that is the philosophy behind the design. The check valve closes when it sees positive pressure from the intake manifold, the turbo feed tube provides a vacuum to open the PCV open, even if it's a smidge.
There's another kit on the market that relies only on turbo feed tube vacuum pressure to open the PCV and evacuate the catch can. They actually cap off the vacuum supply on the intake manifold, to have consistent vacuum at the PCV.

Edit:
I found the link.. Here's the link to the another catch can setup.. That uses only the feed tube vacuum line..
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
If you have questions about how to plumb the hoses or how the system is designed to work properly, I would highly recommend simply emailing the manufacturer at ADD W1 directly.

You can reach Jack at [email protected] and he is more than happy to assist with answering questions that anyone has.

Many times different people will have different opinions on what they think is the right way or the wrong way to do something.

However, by checking with the manufacturer of the product, the one who engineered and designed it, you are guaranteed to get the most accurate information.
Yes I agree, after thinking over the design and seeing other setups provided by reputable tuning shops. I believe I understand the thought process of the manufacturer, at this point my only concern would be if the breather side starts leaking fluid. I'm under the impression that side of the system is baffled and doesn't produce many vapors. I'll also inspect the check valves after a few months to see if they develop any build up/clogging.
 

·
Registered
2011 Kia Optima
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
at this point my only concern would be if the breather side starts leaking fluid. I'm under the impression that side of the system is baffled and doesn't produce many vapors. I'll also inspect the check valves after a few months to see if they develop any build up/clogging.
Yes, that would be interesting to see if that "filter" will yield any residue, and this brings up an interesting idea. On the clean side, some make a "oil cap filter" with an extended tube that would allow a hose to be connected from the cap to the intake tube, which is a good idea.

We'll see.
 

·
Registered
2015 KIA Optima
Joined
·
36 Posts
Yes, that would be interesting to see if that "filter" will yield any residue, and this brings up an interesting idea. On the clean side, some make a "oil cap filter" with an extended tube that would allow a hose to be connected from the cap to the intake tube, which is a good idea.

We'll see.
If it becomes a concern or if it's needed to pass any state testing. The instructions say you can tee into the feed tube line. If the PCV is being evacuated under boost conditions the Crank case/Valve cover pressure should stay relatively low, and the breather or tee shouldn't see vapor's.
With the tee setup, it will be like a single can setup with the advantage of vacuum under boost. Time will tell.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top