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2011 Kia Optima
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have or have seen the drain kit for the above catch can?
Rather than the need for removing the reservoir to dump the oil
collection, I was going to create a drain for the bottom before install,
but if the "kit" is quality, thought it would be a wise investment and a
time saver.
TIA
 

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2018 Kia Optima
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Not having seen this drain kit myself, but IMHO it doesn't take much effort to remove the reservoir--heck it takes more time and effort to remove the oil filter than it does to remove the reservoir...not unless your OCC is mounted in a place that doesn't offer enough room for your hands to unscrew the reservoir.
 

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Your K5 Optima Vendor
Tesla Model X P100D
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28,737 Posts
We have them in stock here NOW.

They are pretty high quality TBH.

Aluminum petcock drain valve kit, with provided hoses long enough to drain easily.

Includes the fitting to attach to the bottom of the can as well.

Let me know if you're interested and want to order one.

247613
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
K5 thanks for the reply.


Not having seen this drain kit myself, but IMHO it doesn't take much effort to remove the reservoir--heck it takes more time and effort to remove the oil filter than it does to remove the reservoir...not unless your OCC is mounted in a place that doesn't offer enough room for your hands to unscrew the reservoir.
I think the drain along with the 6' of hose would make it quite easy to drain the reservoir, and the only problem I can foresee with splitting of the OCC is the O ring and I'm certain I'd keep an extra in stock.
 

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In my defense I wasn't implying that the drain kit wouldn't make draining the OCC easier, just simply saying that it doesn't take much effort to unscrew the reservoir. Yes the O-ring is a potential failure point but one could also argue that hypothetically speaking, the petcock does introduce another potential source of leakage; yes the odds of leakage from the petcock is very minimal but it's a possibility nonetheless. I would also imagine that you'd have a bit more leeway/heads-up if the O-ring fails since the OCC doesn't need to contain a lot of oil for it to leak from a failed petcock vs. a failed O-ring.

Not saying that I would never consider using the OCC drain kit, just having a good-natured argument regarding the pros and cons of using one vs. simply unscrewing the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Haven't installed the occ nor drain. Didn't like the setup of the occ, but the drain is pretty slick. Haven't even opened the kit, but had the location all mapped out and even have a tapered plug for the open end so after the oil/filter change and occ drain, I can insert the plug so that residual oil won't drip.
As stated above, don't think splitting the can is an unusually difficult task, just wanted to avoid any future problem with the occ seal.
 

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2013 Kia Optima
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589 Posts
Would you be willing to share how you're going to map the tubing? Also what plug you went with?

I think I am going to go this route as well because the OCC O-Ring is already falling off every time I open the catch can. Definitely some design problems there. This did not exist as a problem on the previous non-ADD catch cans I've owned on other vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Have discussed this before, but the problem I have is with the ADD OCC that I purchased, it has one inlet, naturally from the PCV valve and two exists, one into the intake manifold where the PCV hose currently exits, then the second is the one I don't feel is proper. That second exit goes to the air intake tube where the OEM air is drawn from, so this means the OEM intake tube is removed and the tube from the OCC is then installed. Now this also means there is no fresh air getting to the engine through the valve cover entry, so their idea is to add an open air filter clamped onto the valve cover, which is illegal and not certain as to how great the filtation might be and/or how often it is to be cleaned, or add a "T" in the line from the OCC to air intake tube. I would go this route, but I don't have the warm and fuzzy feeling that 100% clean, non heated air would be drawn into the engine as it now does with the fresh air entering the engine after it is pulled into the OEM air intake system, then through the air filter, then drawn into the engine.
Maybe I'm being to critical.

As far as the drain hose plug, I purchased a think vacuum hose cap that would be tightly placed over the open end of the hose. There is no pressure in that hose and as the cap is extremely tight as it needs to be turned on, there should be no problem.
 

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Not sure if it makes a significant difference, but given the exact mounting location of the V3.3 when using the supplied Optima-specific OCC mount (the one that attaches to the engine mount), it turns out that the OCC inlet for the hose that connects between it and the PCV is at a higher level relative to the location/height of the PCV itself...at least such is the case with my 2018 2.0T Optima--meaning that blowby has to travel slightly upward from PCV to OCC. Again, not sure if it's really an issue since blowby is evacuated out the PCV using vacuum anyway but still...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do agree, with vacuum it won't make any difference. I've got a boost gauge inside the car, not in the Kia though, that's higher than the dash, but it doesn't change the pressure or vacuum.
 
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