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Discussion Starter #1
Love this car and want to take care of it!

I've been reading about problems with direct injected engines, not just Kia/Hyundai, because the fuel doesn't clean the back of the intake valves since it's directly injected into the cylinder, leading to carbon buildup on the intake valves and reduced efficiency.

CRC Intake Valve and Turbo Cleaner is recommended for this purpose in most threads I've read, and all state to spray it in after the air flow sensor.

Guys, I'm old school and might be able to hang with the middle of the pack on the pre-electronic engines, but where the hay is the best/proper place/way to do this on my engine?
 

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2012 Black SX Prem. & Tech.
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Just to clarify, you have a diesel engine? There might be a different procedure or variation for diesels, so watch out for that. Sorry I don't have much help to offer here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just to clarify, you have a diesel engine? There might be a different procedure or variation for diesels, so watch out for that. Sorry I don't have much help to offer here.
Sorry, I hoped not to leave out any info, but... It's the 1.6L GDI (gas direct injection) turbo engine, not a diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Something like this:

Thanks, HighMiles! The layout of my 1.6 turbo is a little different but I see that the important thing is to get downwind of the MAF sensor. That should be easy enough. Maybe without the issues that this fella had!
 

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2020 Kia Soul X-Line 2.0 MPI
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Clean that intake often every 10k and it also helps to use Top-Tier fuels without ethanol.
Finding stations without ethanol is rare these days. Our state Michigan no longer requires gas station brands to list having ethanol wording on the pumps. So you need to do a little homework to find the brands in your area that don't include it in gasoline.

Most 93 octane fuels here in Michigan do not contain ethanol. But again, you would need to ask around and I've even gone to lengths where I've called the tanker trucking companies that supply the fuel to the station.

Since most purchases are of the 87-octane variety, more diligence is needed to investigate ethanol content number. I haven't purchased 87 octane in a couple years now. My two vehicles seem to run smoother and have more pep using 89-93 octane. But for many here that have tried higher octane, you need to use it 3-4 tankfuls in a row, to best see the true results.
 

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2012 Black SX Prem. & Tech.
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that seems criminal, to add ethanol to the gas, but not be required to indicate that the gas includes ethanol!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After searching online and under the hood I have yet to be able to identify and locate the MAF sensor on the 2019 Kia Optima EX 1.6L turbo GDI engine. No electrical connections to anything in the intake system. It's almost as if it doesn't exist, unless it's just ahead of the turbo intake which I can't get to.
I want o make sure that I'm downstream of the MAF sensor before I spray in the CRC Intake Valve cleaner.
About 16K miles on the car.
 

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2013 Ebony SXL 2nd engine @ 121k
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Isn't it just after the airbox?
 

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2020 Kia Soul X-Line 2.0 MPI
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After searching online and under the hood I have yet to be able to identify and locate the MAF sensor on the 2019 Kia Optima EX 1.6L turbo GDI engine. No electrical connections to anything in the intake system. It's almost as if it doesn't exist, unless it's just ahead of the turbo intake which I can't get to.
I want o make sure that I'm downstream of the MAF sensor before I spray in the CRC Intake Valve cleaner.
About 16K miles on the car.
Google Search? Scroll down when there. If past years are missing the MAF, then yours may be missing also.
does the 1.6 turbo kia engine have a maf sensor - Google Search

Another way to determine if your engine has a specific part, is to walk into Autozone or Advance Auto and try to purchase a MAF Sensor for a 2019 Kia Optima 1.6T.
If the counter clerk puts a MAF Sensor on the counter a minute later, ask the clerk where the MAF is located on the engine.
He / she, may show you a diagram.
 

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2013 Ebony SXL 2nd engine @ 121k
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If it has no MAF, then it does have a MAP. Spray past that too, video above shows where it is on the 1.6. Luck.
 

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2014 Kia Optima 2.4
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While I technically don't fit in this section of the forums as I own a 14 with a 2.4 GDI, as far as I know, I'd be willing to put money on it that your car 100 percent doesn't have a maf sensor, but a map sensor, just take the intake off, have a buddy run the car from 2 to 3k rpm, try to not go past 3,500, they say it's quite bad, I did once on accident but thankfully my motor is fine and very much healthy still. After this give it an hour to heatsoak, lemme mention the motor should be warmed up already when doing this, after you wait on the heatsoak get it on the high way for 10-15 minutes and you should be good, I do like to give it a couple of good pull after to confirm it's not chugging or anything like that, just push the car progressively to higher rpm to test that with more throttle. That CRC stuff is also turbo cleaner, I'd look up how to use it though for that so you can keep the turbo clean as well, never used it on a turboed car but I'll prob be trying it with my buddies SX-L soon enough.
 

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Love this car and want to take care of it!

I've been reading about problems with direct injected engines, not just Kia/Hyundai, because the fuel doesn't clean the back of the intake valves since it's directly injected into the cylinder, leading to carbon buildup on the intake valves and reduced efficiency.

CRC Intake Valve and Turbo Cleaner is recommended for this purpose in most threads I've read, and all state to spray it in after the air flow sensor.

Guys, I'm old school and might be able to hang with the middle of the pack on the pre-electronic engines, but where the hay is the best/proper place/way to do this on my engine?
If the fuel is directly injected into the combustion chamber there wouldn’t be any gasoline on the back of the intake valves therefore there would be no carbon build up. The only thing flowing over the intake valves is air. Can somebody please tell me why there would be carbon buildup on the intake valves?
 

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If the fuel is directly injected into the combustion chamber there wouldn’t be any gasoline on the back of the intake valves therefore there would be no carbon build up. The only thing flowing over the intake valves is air. Can somebody please tell me why there would be carbon buildup on the intake valves?
.
 
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